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    Our Five Pillars
    We are self-directed learners
    We encourage each other to think critically and learn more
    We are concerned, confident and compassionate citizens of the world
    We learn everywhere, we learn together
    We are creative

    UNIQUE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT
    Queen Anne Elementary was designed around our Five Pillars with a digital learning emphasis. As an Option School, we unified our Project Based Learning (PBL) approach and Social Emotional Learning (SEL) practices with our Five Pillars. These three components are the foundation of our curriculum and guide our staff and students' pursuit to develop a community of 21st Century learners.

    POSITIVE DISCIPLINE
    Our welcoming learning community provides opportunities for every student to develop learning and life skills in addition to academic rigor through Positive Discipline. Common language and approaches help each student to feel safe, connected and valued. Developed by the nationally acclaimed author, Dr. Jane Nelson, Positive Discipline in the Classroom program teaches important social and life skills and is designed to teach young people to become responsible, respectful and resourceful members of their communities.

    CRITERIA FOR POSITIVE DISCIPLINE
    • Helps children feel a sense of connection, belonging and significance.
    • It is mutually respectful and encouraging, kind and firm at the same time.
    • It is effective long-term. (Considers what the child is thinking, feeling, learning and deciding about himself and his world - and what to do in the future to survive or thrive.
    • Teaches important social and life skills. (Respect, concern for others, problem solving and cooperation, as well as the skills to contribute to the home, school or larger community.)
    • Invites children to discover how capable they are. (Encourages the constructive use of personal power and autonomy.)

    ZONES OF REGULATION
    The goal of the Zones curriculum is to teach children about self-regulation, and to give them opportunities to practice and strengthen their self-regulation skills. Self-regulation can go by many names, such as self-control, self-management and impulse control. Self-regulation is an essential life skill and, in all learning, and work environments. Children who can regulation their own emotion and attention are better ready to learn and thrive. Zones of Regulation groups all the ways that children feel and act into four “Zones”.
    Green Zone – when you are ready “good to go”. You feel happy, calm and focused.
    Blue Zone – when your body is running slowly, such as when you are tired, sick sad or bored.
    Yellow Zone – when you feel your engine running high, such as when you are frustrated, overwhelmed, silly, wiggly, excited, worried, anxious or surprised.
    Red Zone – when you have “flipped your lid”. You have extreme feelings such as uncontrolled anger, aggression or elation.

    PROJECT BASED LEARNING (PBL)
    Project Based Learning (PBL) is an inquiry-based way of learning that is followed at QAE. Explorers go through an extended process of inquiry in response to a complex question, problem or challenge. While allowing for some degree of student “voice and choice,” rigorous curricular-aligned projects are carefully planned, managed and assessed to help students learn key academic content, practice 21st century skills (collaboration, communication, critical thinking and creativity), and create high-quality, authentic products and presentations. Students are assessed using curricular assessments aligned with Gold Standard PBL learning goals. QAE's annual December PBL Showcase and June PBL Symposium allows students and families to learn about each K - 5 explorer's PBL initiatives. QAE explorers work on their inquiry questions for weeks, and this evening event is a chance for students to share their expertise and celebrate their learning.

    SOCIAL EMOTIONAL LEARNING (SEL)
    Social Emotional Learning (SEL) is a process of developing social and emotional skills for academic success as well as life success. Examples of social and emotional skills are being able to recognize, understand and express one’s own emotions; controlling impulses and establishing and maintaining positive relationships. SEL may also refer to a school curriculum that develops social and emotional skills.

    WHAT DOES SEL INSTRUCTION LOOK LIKE?
    There are many ways to provide SEL instruction to school-age children. The most natural is for the adults at the school to connect regularly with students and to model respect, kindness and connectedness. For example, greeting students by name as they arrive at school.
    Additional SEL instruction might include explicit instruction about emotions, positive communication or self-regulation. This is provided through classroom instruction, assemblies or additional programming, such as Positive Discipline curriculum. Classroom meetings also provide opportunities to introduce children to SEL skills and to allow them to be able to practice those skills.

    WHERE IS SEL AT QAE?
    SEL has been offered since QAE opened its doors! From the first day of school, teachers and staff have employed the SEL best practices of connecting with each child as an individual, valuing and validating citizenship and acts of empathy, inviting presentations like BookIt Theatre to showcase literature focused on SEL, and encouraging children to be decision-makes in their education. Indeed, a hallmark of the staff at QAE is that they value and promote a learning environment that is grounded in trusting and respectful relationships.

    There are many ways to provide SEL instruction to school-age children. The most natural is for the adults at the school to connect regularly with students and to model respect, kindness and connectedness. For example, greeting students by name as they arrive at school.

    Additional SEL instruction might include explicit instruction about emotions, positive communication or self-regulation. This is provided through classroom instruction, assemblies or additional programming, such as Positive Discipline curriculum. Classroom meetings also provide opportunities to introduce children to SEL skills and to allow them to be able to practice those skills.

    TECHNOLOGY
    Technology is integrated into the classroom, across curriculum, to deepen and enhance learning through our One to World device program. One to World empowers students to research, create, connect, and collaborate. Students actively engage and work together to capture their creativity and learning through technology tools such as cameras, video, audio, and multi-media productions. Students connect and learn with classrooms around the world through programs like Mystery Skype. Technology also changes the ways teachers teach—One to World offers effective ways for teachers to reach different types of learners to help make learning more meaningful and fun.

    ADVANCED LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES (ALO)
    Our school environment encourages the positive social and emotional development of all students. The ALO Report Card is utilized to ensure that our advanced students are receiving an accelerated curriculum corresponding with the Washington State Grade Level Expectations. Several differentiation strategies are used that include acceleration within the regular classroom, cluster grouping, flexible groupings for instruction, and technology integration to support project-based learning.

    WHAT DOES INNOVATIVE LEARNING LOOK LIKE AT QAE?
    Innovative research-based teaching practices and digital tools are at the heart of innovative learning. Teachers align their work with Harvard-based Cultures of Thinking (Ritchhart), Growth Mindset (Dweck) and Visible Learning (Hattie). Research-based practices are integrated across curricula to deepen and enhance learning to empower students to research, create, connect and collaborate.

    SUPERFLEX 
    Superflex®: A Superhero Social Thinking Curriculum provides educators and parents with empowering ways to build student’s social communication skills. It helps students increase their awareness of their own thinking and social behaviors, and learn strategies to help them develop better self-regulation across a range of behaviors.

    SEL Therapy Dog, Biggie
    Queen Anne has its own Social Emotional Learning Therapy Dog, Biggie. Based in our Resource Room, Biggie accompanies Resource Room Teacher, Ms. Manno, to visit classes to promote self-regulation and self-calming. Biggie is an important new member of our school community!